I-dot in your signature

If you have an i dot in your signature, give some thought to what it will say about you. Remember that all the usual rules of handwriting analysis apply, but they are magnified and personalized by being in your signature. Of course, i-dots only appear in lower case i, so if you have a capital I in your name, the guidelines below do not apply to that.

– a drawn or “creative” i-dot suggests that you need to stand out as being different. This is a very common stroke to find the writing of teenage girls.

– a jabbed, short, straight line for an i dot is someone who is feeling rather restless or even irritated, or perhaps just in always in a hurry.

– no i-dot, where there is a lower case i is someone who does not pay due attention to detail.

– an i-dot which then continues as the lead in stroke for the next letter, shows intelligence and creativity.

– an i dot meticullously close to the top of the lower case i is a writer who takes meticulous care of the smaller details. Good for accountants, engineers etc, but can be a problem in more people centered work.

And lastly, a lower case i, with or without a dot, used in place of a capital I (at the beginning of a name, or as a middle initial) shows either genuine underestimation of self, or trying to project an image of extreme modesty. The rest of the writing will show which it is. It is most likely to be an image the writer is trying to give.

So although the i-dot is small and often unobtrusive, it carries true meaning as to the character of the writer. So if you have an i-dot in your signature, give some thought as to how you want to be seen.

Read a free article on the i-dots in handwriting…

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Sign your name with confidence

Just as people can tell if you are confident by meeting you, they can also tell if you are confident from looking at your signature. Often without any handwriting analysis training, too!

But the nice thing about confidence is that it is one of the “fake it till you make it” traits. You can make yourself feel and look, and write, with confidence at least over the short span, even if you don’t feel very confident most of the time.

Let’s say you are going to put your signature to an important document and you want to show confidence. It could be the cover letter as you apply for that all important job.

Get the letter all typed, printed out and ready for your signature.

Now sit back, relax, close you eyes, and think confidence. Tell yourself how confident you are. Visual the results of you being confident, of your confidence being rewarded (in this scenario it would be getting the job). Keep visualizing and thinking confidence, and when you feel you have achieved it, open your eyes and write your name, without taking time to allow your doubts to return. Write your name thinking how proud you are to be you, to be the possessor of all the great traits and abilities that you have.

This should make your signature more confident in general.

One of the ways confidence shows in a signature is when it is slightly larger than the rest of the writing – but not too big, that would indicate arrogance.

So sign with confidence. And then having seen what difference there is in your confident signature over previous versions, keep doing the confident one from now on. Soon it will be part of you.

More on signature analysis…

Signature Analysis: writing high flying, long tails on your name


What does it mean when the tail on your first name goes way high above the rest of the lower case letter? If this only occurs in that name alone it means it’s very personal. If it occurs elsewhere too, it means it’s a more general trait evident most of the time.

That high flying end stroke is a cry for attention. It’s like waving your arm in the air saying “notice me, notice me.” Put more diplomatically is shows that you like recognition when you believe you deserve it.

Either way, you want to be noticed.

For more on analyzing signatures…

Try the Free Signature Analysis Quiz at www.potentiality.biz

Signature Analysis: It only happens in my signature!

Any stroke that only happens in your signature has special significance.

Your signature is very personal, so a stroke that happens only there applies to you on a very personal level.

If it is in your first name, it’s you, the individual.

If it is in your last name, it applies to your family (whether biological family or created family)

So take a good look at your signature compared to the rest of your writing to notice any unique strokes in the signature, then read up on your handwriting analysis to work out what these strokes mean.

What happens when I change my name?

Whether you change your name because you are getting married and have decided to take your husband’s name, or changing it for some other reason, provided you are happy with the new name, it will show the same qualities as your previous name.

Obviously some letters show specific things, and if you had a great many lower case “t”s in your previous name and none in your new name, then the qualities shown only in the lower case “t” would not be evident in your new name. This doesn’t mean you don’t have them any more, it just means the appropriate letter is not there, so those qualities cannot be evaluated from your new signature.

If you are unhappy with your new name, or if you were unhappy with your old name (say it was your spouse’s surname and you are very happy to no longer be married) then you can expect to see that change. Happy in upslanting writing, unhappy in downslanting writing. Occasionally a score through the name you didn’t like, in the form of a flourish or extended t-bar.

But even so, the basic personality will still be the same.

For more on signatures and what they tell you.

Small capitals in signature

What does it mean when someone’s signature has noticeably small capitals?

It is an indication of modesty. This writer does not seek the limelight. S/he may like to be in the center of things, knowing what is going on (this will show if their signature is in the middle of the page) but they don’t want to be noticed and attract attention.

Of course, there is what is called “false modesty” – someone who really longs for attention but pretends they don’t.

The real person shows in the body of the writing, the signature just shows how the person wants to be seen. So if the body of the writing is more flamboyant, attention seeking, with a modest signature, you will know that the modesty is not real and that this writer has, for some reason, decided to look as though they want to be low key, when in reality they seek recognition and attention.


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Should you develop a Power Signature?

I am sometimes asked how to develop a “Power Signature”, one that contains all the “good” traits you want to have, and will, subconsiously or consciously, impress all who see it.

It is important to remember that you signature only shows the person you want others to see you as.

So if you are content with a power signature only, it means you are content to put on a show to impress others, but are not really concerned with who you really are!

Much better to start developing the traits you want in ALL of your writing, including your signature.

When both are the same, it’s a “what you see is what you get” scenario. Much better than “this is what I want you to see, but I’m really much different” that comes with a signature made to look good, while the real person remains with it’s flaws.

That is not to say I think everyone needs to change their writing. I don’t.

But if you are unhappy with who you are, or who you appear to others to be (which unless you are putting on a show, is the same thing), it’s time to take action on the whole person, not just the shop-front!

Grapho-therapy, or Grapho-coaching takes you through this process of changing your writing slowly and effectively. It takes 21 days to break a habit, and even longer to put one of your own choosing in it’s place.

Change doesn’t happen overnight, so whether you use your handwriting to affect change, or some other method, you have to be patient.

So if you are unhappy with who you are in any area of your life, you can take the steps to change it.

But please, take the time to work on the real you – don’t waste time putting up a false front, which is what a “power signature” on otherwise “unpowerful” writing would be.

For more on how to change your writing to change your life…

For more on Signatures…

Signature Analysis: Gaps between Names

Most people sign more than one name. It may be as simple as one initial and name, or it may be 3 or 4 names written out in full.

Look carefully at the spacing between the names. If there is just one name and an initial, or two names, then you only have that one space to go with, and the comparison can only be made between the spacing in the signature and the spacing in the rest of the writing. However, that is better than nothing.

Better though, is when there are more than 2 names. 2 initials and a last name, 2 names and an initial, 3 names, or more. All of these give more than one space between name or intial.

Is the spacing consistent between all? Or is there a larger gap between one than others?

A larger space means distancing oneself. So if, let’s say someone writes their first name, their middle initial, and then their last name with a larger space between the middli initial and the last name than there is between the first name and the initial. What does this tell us?

The first name, and the middle initial is the individual person. The exception here is if the middle name is that of a close relative after whom the person has been named. In that case, the middle name may be taken as representing that relative..
The last name is always the family name and as such represents family in general.

So if the last name is isolated by a wider than usual space from the rest of the name, the writer is distancing themself from family. If the larger gap is between the first name and the middle name or initial (especially if this is named after a close family member) then the first name (ie the writer themself) is distancing themself from the family in general and also specifically from the person who’s middle name they were given.

It can be a sign of trouble in a marriage when a larger than previous gap starts to appear regularly before the last name, whether in a man or woman’s signature.

Spacing is something that’s easy to overlook, but can give very important information.

Find out more about analyzing signatures.

Or try the Signature Party Game… fun, easy, unique … light hearted fun with signatures for groups of any size.

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Writing your Signature in another language

I recently received a question from a reader asking if it was legal to sign one’s name in another language.

My answer to that is that I have no idea, and I suppose it would depend on what you were signing and in what country you were at that time.

However, it did give thought to the idea of a signature in another language and how that works for handwriting analysis.

Since the purpose of the signature is to tell the reader who is writing, a signature that is legible to the reader is the best idea. But what if you come from, say, China and you would very much like to continue using your Chinese script signature.

That is fine. But if it’s a document for English speaking readers, I would suggest you sign your signature in your native language first, then immediately below sign the English version of your signature.

If you have 2 names – one in your native language and have adopted another in English, then sign the name appropriate to each language (ie your Chinese name in Chinese, your English name in English)

How does this connect with handwriting analysis?
Your English signature will still analyze just like anyone else’s signature, provided you are fluid enough in English script that your writing doesn’t look awkward and as if it’s an effort to remember each stroke.

And once you become familiar with graphology, your knowledge of another script will allow you to also analyze that script in the same way.

But in the meantime, as you “create” your English language signature, take some time to ensure it includes as many positive traits as possible … because one it becomes second nature to you to write this name this way, these traits are the ones that you will be showing the world.

Need more help in finding what traits mean what in a signature? Find it here.

Signing other than your name

When you sign something other than your name, say “Mum” or “Dad”, the word takes on the same importance as the signature. However, the image is narrower in it’s focus.

Whereas your entire signature is how you see yourself before the world, your signature of “Mum” shows only how you see yourself to your children.

The same, of course, goes for any other title, say “Grandpa” or “Grandma”.

So if you have occasion to write either of these, look carefully at how you sign those titles in comparison to how you sign your actual name in general, and find out how differently you see yourself before these members of your family.

Of course, there is always the “what you see is what you get” signature, where it is just the real you, no image, that shows. In this case, one would expect to particular difference in the “Mom” etc title either.

However if there is a problem between you and the family member to whom you are writing this title, it will show in how you write it.

Naturally, all this applies to letters you receive from “titled” people as well as those you write.

More on signatures.