I write this way because….

How often have I heard this “reason” for something that is in someone’s writing or signature!

“I write this way because it’s the way I was taught at school” is the commonest.

OK, so when were you at school?

If your teacher stopped smacking your knuckles with a ruler when you put the wrong size of loop on your “j” or made your capitals too large, last week, then I agree: you are doing it because your teacher said so.

But if it is several, or even many years since you stopped being under the influence of Miss StrictTeacher, then it’s also time to stop blaming her for how you write!!

Do you write every single stroke exactly the way your teacher showed you?

Of course you don’t. You’ve chosen some to leave as is, and some to change.

If you have indeed retained any of the strokes exactly as she showed you, it’s because these strokes are a fit for your personality. Otherwise you would have changed them.

So don’t blame your teacher.

Instead, take the time to find out what your signature says about you, and then change anything you don’t like into something that says what you want it to say about you.

Handwriting is body language. Change your body language over a period of time and you will change the personality trait associated with it.

You can find out more about Success Traits here…

Writing your Signature in another language

I recently received a question from a reader asking if it was legal to sign one’s name in another language.

My answer to that is that I have no idea, and I suppose it would depend on what you were signing and in what country you were at that time.

However, it did give thought to the idea of a signature in another language and how that works for handwriting analysis.

Since the purpose of the signature is to tell the reader who is writing, a signature that is legible to the reader is the best idea. But what if you come from, say, China and you would very much like to continue using your Chinese script signature.

That is fine. But if it’s a document for English speaking readers, I would suggest you sign your signature in your native language first, then immediately below sign the English version of your signature.

If you have 2 names – one in your native language and have adopted another in English, then sign the name appropriate to each language (ie your Chinese name in Chinese, your English name in English)

How does this connect with handwriting analysis?
Your English signature will still analyze just like anyone else’s signature, provided you are fluid enough in English script that your writing doesn’t look awkward and as if it’s an effort to remember each stroke.

And once you become familiar with graphology, your knowledge of another script will allow you to also analyze that script in the same way.

But in the meantime, as you “create” your English language signature, take some time to ensure it includes as many positive traits as possible … because one it becomes second nature to you to write this name this way, these traits are the ones that you will be showing the world.

Need more help in finding what traits mean what in a signature? Find it here.