Body Language and how it shows in your handwriting

Body Language

Body Language is the study of movement

When someone smiles or laughs you assume they are happy or amused – unless their face shows that they are faking it. Either way, you are interpreting what you see, the body language the person is exhibiting.

When someone has bangs doors and thumps the table with their fist, you read the body language and usually, unless there is more body language indicating something else, you assume they are angry.

We all do it. It is natural to us to read body language. Of course, police and psychologists learn more about body language and so are better at picking up the clues from it.

Likewise, when you hold a pen and write, you are exhibiting body language. If you are angry at that time the way you hold and move the pen will differ from if you are relaxed and happy. And so too, the writing that you make will be different at these different times.

The special thing about the body language of writing is that it leaves a mark of how the body moved – the ink lines on the page. So when you write when you are blazing mad and when you write when you are calm and relaxed, the lines, or writing on the page will be different.

Agreed?

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Becoming a Graphologist: The Life of a Professional Handwriting Analyst

Becoming a Graphologist:

magnifying glass

A Look Inside the Working Life of a Professional Handwriting Analyst

People often ask what was behind me becoming a Graphologist.

A friend had a tongue in cheek, answer “You’re just nosey!”. I have another – I was bored! Continue reading

Your Handwriting tells how you will act in a Crisis

Your Handwriting tells how you will act in a Crisis

So how is it that your handwriting tells how you act in a crisis or handle an emergency situation?

And what use is that anyway?

To answer the second question first: by understanding both your own and others natural response to crises you can be better prepared for both the event and the response.

For example, someone who writes with a far forward slant gets very emotionally involved very quickly. Continue reading

Writing problems and handwriting analysis

I have just recently broken my wrist (which is why there have been no blog postings here for a while!) It is my left wrist and I am right handed, so this is good news.

However, several people have asked, if I had broken my right wrist, and had to start writing with my left, how the obvious change in my writing would relate to the analysis of my writing.

It’s an easy question to answer.

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Signatures and the Personal Pronoun “I”

Personal pronoun “I” is very personal, just as a signature is very personal.

So what do these two tell us that is different from each other?

The signature is the person the writer wants the world to see and think s/he is.

It is her/his conscious projection of who the writer wants to show they are.  It is a projection of who they want to be seen as.

But is it the real person?

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Honesty and Deceit

“Is this person telling the truth? “

This is one of the commonest questions people ask.

  • They ask it of themselves.
  • They ask it of others.
  • They ask it of me when I am looking at handwriting.

And yes, handwriting does show honesty and deceit clearly.

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Success Self Help

Success!

A difficult word to tie down. It means something different to almost every individual on the planet. And it means different things to the same person at different times.

But one thing is common for all. It is a mindset. The determination to do whatever it is that will give you the feeling of achievement.

Some people have more of it in life than others. Some people equate it only with financial gain. Others achieve everything they want in life without earning a penny.

What is the difference between the person who has gained this elusive quality and the one who has not?

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Show your Independence

In handwriting, independence comes in three shapes and sizes, each with its own distinctive strokes and each with its own distinctive meaning.

You may have all.

You may have one.

You may have two.

You may have none of these strokes.

Check your writing to find your independence rating.

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